Yes, You Should Get Your Child the HPV Vaccine

The following is a Facebook response I crafted to a woman who was opposed to the HPV vaccine because she felt that the risks of the vaccine did not outweigh the benefit. Since it was lengthy, I share it on my own profile, and my friends asked that I make it public. Subsequently, I was asked to make it into a blog post. So here we are.

I find this argument interesting, but I wonder how much of it comes from a sense of complacency. It seems a little bit like a skewed risk assessment more than anything, borne out of complacency.

This isn’t an insult. Let me explain. If I don’t vaccinate my child against measles, that child could be exposed to measles tomorrow (hypothetically) and contract measles. The consequences of not vaccinating my child could be immediate, and I would have no control.

If I don’t vaccinate my child against HPV, he’s not coming down with cancer tomorrow. However, it is possible that through his own sexual activity (though not necessarily consensual and not necessarily intercourse), he could be exposed to HPV in the next few years and then, in 20 or so years, the HPV infection could lead to cancer.

So the risk of HPV-caused cancer seem distant, and there are plenty of rumors about the HPV vaccine (which, by the way, are false).

If I don’t vaccinate my child against measles, he could be one of the 60-600 people infected in the U.S. this year. (My own state saw 79 cases this spring/summer–so the threat was real.)

If I don’t vaccinate my child against HPV, he could be one of the 16,500 men (and 39,800 people) who gets cancer in the United States. There is no Pap smear-like test for oropharyngeal cancer, penile cancer, or anal cancer currently, so we wouldn’t know he had cancer until he became symptomatic.

But even with Pap smears, 4,000 women die in the United States right now from cervical cancer alone–almost all of which is caused by HPV. Before the vaccine, 450 children died every year from measles. So in reality, a girl is 10 times more likely to die from HPV-related cervical cancer than her grandparents were from measles. That alone seems to make it worth preventing, and doesn’t mention the damage done to a woman’s body if her cancer is caught early or in the pre-cancerous stage. The risks go beyond death into infertility, pain, suffering, etc.

The data we have, now, is that HPV infections have been reduced by 90% in places like Australia and they are way down, despite our low uptake rate with the HPV vaccine, in the United States. One study of more than a million girls in Scandinavia showed absolutely no serious side effects from this vaccine.

The other issue is how diseases are contracted. Tetanus is also a behavioral illness. Just don’t get a dirty puncture wound, and you will be fine, right? It isn’t infectious–yet every state requires this vaccine for school entry.

Of course we require this vaccine. You can’t really avoid tetanus by just being careful.

And you can’t really avoid HPV by being careful or abstinent before marriage. Unlike HIV, HPV is not passed along via secretions. It lives on the skin. If someone wears a condom, he can still pass on HPV. Deep kissing can pass on HPV. Non-consensual sexual contact can pass on HPV. A virgin can get HPV on her wedding night from a spouse who caught it before marriage. It is much more like contracting tetanus than we think, and for many people, they have absolutely no control over whether or not they contract it.

So I wonder–does it still seem worth the risk to pass on this vaccine?

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Pro-Vaccine World Tour

On Friday, I found myself protesting an anti-vaccine bus. A decade ago, I could not have imagined even writing such a sentence, but there I was.

Some backstory, first.  (Scroll down if you don’t need the backstory.)

In 2011, amidst a growing measles outbreak among some unvaccinated Somali-American children in Minnesota, Andrew Wakefield flew into town and held a private meeting with them. Who knows what was said in this meeting since the people in attendance were parents of autistic children who are convinced of the vaccine connection and Wakefield–a defrocked pediatric gastroenterologist. I mean, what could he say? Who knows, but it was history.

Until April of this year when measles made a predictable comeback to the same community. Wakefield didn’t come back, but there was plenty of anti-vaccine outreach into the Somali-American community to convince them not to trust public health officials (to the consternation of many Somali-Americans). The Washington Post also reported talk about white parents of exposing their children purposely to measles and convincing Somali-American mothers that there was no measles outbreak, that it was all a trick concocted by public health.

And that’s all bad enough, but the anti-vaccine community in Minnesota has been actively working on translating Wakefield’s 2015 fraudumentary, Vaxxed, into Somali for further indoctrination. I’m not done. We were all disheartened when Tribeca announced (and eventually retracted) that Vaxxed would be screened, but now the film is available on Amazon Prime and a tour RV/bus (it’s an RV, okay?) containing Polly Tommy and her friends is making its way through the country and recording stories of so-called vaccine-injury (usually autism).

Enter self-described Pro-Vaccine Troll, Craig Egan. Craig asked his Facebook friends and fans if he should follow the Vaxxed RV/bus/it’s an RV à la Grateful Dead. $10,000 in GoFundMe donations later, he was pulling into Minneapolis and following the Vaxxed vehicle.

On the day the measles outbreak was finally declared over.

End of backstory.

Everyone wants to know what it was like confronting the Vaxxed jalopy, and so I thought I would write out my story. The day before, I wanted Craig to get a real sense of what we are really fighting for–preventing kids from getting sick. So I took him to Children’s Minnesota to meet Patsy Stinchfield and Joe Kurland, who worked directly with the measles cases and with system-wide infection prevention. He interviewed them on video (and they interviewed him back):

At this point, we still had no idea where the bus was going to be. The anti-vaxxers in Minnesota were being purposely coy about where they were filming. Even though it was the day before and we had had feelers out for weeks trying to figure out where it would be, we didn’t know. But one journalist got confirmation of where it would be, and I called him Friday morning and was lucky enough to find out. This is where I admit that we tipped off a few reporters, as well. When I arrived, Craig, his girlfriend Sharon, Joe Kurland, a few mothers, and a reporter were there, being filmed by an anti-vaccine mom standing at a distance. I waved hello because I am polite.

Not much happened other than some good conversation on our end and worried looks shot our way from theirs. Joe decided to do a Facebook Live video.

Eventually Patsy Stinchfield arrived and Joe left. She pointed out the Sunday Mail journalist Ian Birrell was over at the RV. He had interviewed both of us in the week prior, and we were both impressed with his depth of knowledge concerning science and the anti-vaccine movement–especially Andrew Wakefield in particular. I knew he had connected with Polly Tommey, and he allowed her to interview him aboard their transport.

Because Patsy is brave and I want to grow up to be just like her because she is also smart and pretty and amazing, she decided she wanted to get up close to see the Vaxxed wagon. A number of people had been staring at use almost the entire time we had been there, and they didn’t look happy that we were walking closer. I held out my hand and introduced myself to a few people, only because I wanted to convey to them that I was not there to belittle or harm them. I feel like giving people your name helps you connect as people rather than representatives of some opposing side. Most of them shook my hand and told me their names, too. They were polite.

One woman, however, did refuse to shake my hand. I felt a little like Angela Merkel, and hey–that’s not bad company to be in. She also would not tell me her name. I don’t know if she was afraid of what I would do with her name (honestly, I am terrible with names, so forget is the correct answer) or if she was just being hostile.

She wanted us to say something about the names written on the bus. (The names are supposed to represent people who have been injured by vaccines. I did notice how many of the names were written in groups by the same hand, and it seems an improbability to me that anyone would have multiple people from the same family who suffered a true adverse reaction to a vaccine.)

In any case, we didn’t reply as she wanted, and she expressed her displeasure. She wanted us to know that the names were important, so I tried to prove I was listening to her by paraphrasing what I believed she was saying, but that also made her angry. I supposed she didn’t like my paraphrasing. I was trying, though! Perhaps she was just spoiling for an argument.

She told us that if our brakes went out in our cars, we would want to warn other people. Patsy commented that brakes are a good analogy, except that with vaccines, we need everyone to use their brakes or else we are all in trouble. We can’t allow people to opt out of brakes. This unnamed woman told us that we couldn’t use a car as a comparison because the human body is not a car. Craig pointed out to her that the car/brake analogy was hers, but that didn’t satisfy her. I’m also not really a huge fan of arguing about analogies. The thing about analogies is that they are always imperfect. The only thing that is exactly like the thing is the thing. So we moved on.

Another woman then approached us. She did give us her name (I am not going to disclose it here), shook our hands, and told us that she was vaccine injured. Patsy asked what happened, and she said she had a stroke after the flu vaccine.

I’ll just pause briefly for an evidence aside. The flu vaccine is, in fact, associated with a temporary drop in the risk of strokes and heart attacks. Unpause.

She disclosed some other information to us that isn’t pertinent to anything and I don’t think is appropriate to share publicly. It was a calm, polite conversation. No minds were changed. She probably doesn’t like us.

We returned to our picnic table, and Ian came over and chatted with us briefly. His photographer took a photo of us. He asked us not to smile, but he was standing next to an adorable baby who kept waving at us.

As we stood there, someone we called Frisbee Guy walked past and said, “I’m with you guys!” I guess while I was at the bus with Patsy, a family on a Surrey bike pointed at the Vaxxed vector and shouted, “They are the ones who caused the measles outbreak!”

Craig presented me with a check for Voices for Vaccines. He donated a third of his GoFundMe proceeds, which was incredibly generous.

As I drove home, I heard a reporter from Minnesota Public Radio give an in-depth (and really well-covered) report on the end of the measles outbreak and the Vaxxed cohort’s dealings. If possible, please listen rather than read the MPR report, as it is abbreviated in print.

If you live in Minnesota, please use the contact form on this blog to reach me and to learn how to combat the anti-vaccine movement. The next measles outbreak will happen if we do not act now.

Lessons learned:

  1. There is only one Craig Egan.
  2. Anti-vaxxers want to argue. Kind of. Not about car brakes.
  3. Read the dimensions on Amazon products carefully.
  4. Eric Clapton became a terrible person while I wasn’t looking, so I can’t tell you who I thought looked like him. (I now denounce that opinion. He was much handsomer than Clapton.)
  5. The Vaxxed tour is devolving into the end of the Spinal Tap tour. All they need is their miniature Stonehenge.
  6. Pro-vaxxers are awesome, and they are often huggers.

 

How we create vaccine hesitancy

We have responsibility in the rising tide of vaccine hesitancy. Granted, most of the responsibility belongs to the charlatans and the grifters in the anti-vaccine community. But all of us have created a world where being afraid of vaccines only makes sense.

How did we do this? It was not our tone, and it wasn’t our failure to talk about the science. Instead, all of us agreed to view healthcare as a consumer commodity and took the expert opinion away from our doctors and gave it to the patients.

What do I mean? Take a look:

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Facebook post from Minnesota Star Tribune captioned with: “Armed with the right questions, you, too, can become an empowered patient ready to make informed decisions.”

I found that post while scrolling through my Facebook feed, and the caption caught my eye more than the article. For the record, the ten questions the article suggests you ask your doctor are very good and would have you relying on your doctor’s expertise.

The caption is problematic because it alludes to “empowered patients” and “informed decisions.” (People who dwell in the vaccine advocacy world likely instinctively bristle at the term informed decisions.) For far too many parents, such statements translate into a belief that they need to inform themselves ahead of time in order to get the medical care they want, and that the power and responsibility over their children’s medical care is solely the parent’s.

Dr. Jennifer Reich, in an article titled “Of natural bodies and antibodies: Parents’ vaccine refusal and the dichotomies of natural and artificial,” makes this point perfectly:

In fact, vaccine resistance lies at the intersection of two ideologies: one that expects parents to intensively invest in their children and the other that calls for individuals to become savvy consumers of technology and health interventions.

Oftentimes mothers, who make the majority of vaccination decisions, feel the duty to demonstrate their love for their children by learning all they can about healthcare choices, from feeding to sleep safety products to vaccines. They stand in sharp contrast to their grandmothers, who for too many years acquiesced to all medical advice and didn’t presume to demand more information from their doctors. In fact, many of us spent a lot of energy cajoling our grandmothers to ask their doctors why they were being prescribed Xanax in lieu of allergy medication or to ask for more testing of their heart health.

As I grow older, and the generation just behind me is wading through the too much pediatric information readily available to them, I see how the lessons we tried to teach our grandmothers needed to be titrated for the next generations–the generation of girls growing up under Title IX who were not accused of attending college only for an MRS degree. Even as we still live in an era of rampant sexism, 20- and 30-something women may not recognize how much more empowered they are than the Greatest Generation of women.

And when you do not see the path that was trod behind you, a doctor who tells you that he is not comfortable with your decision to eschew vaccines might seem paternalistic, which is why so many anti-vaccine parents accuse doctors of bullying. After all, aren’t you informed, just as society tells you to be in order to prove your skills as a decent parent? Isn’t it your commission to seek out empowerment in all things parenting, but in especially healthcare?

Perhaps you already noticed that the way doctors try to empower patients differs from the way parents think they are supposed to become empowered. It is true that information is power, but only good information is good power. And the best place to find good information? The experts. In other words, empowered patients know how to get the best information from their doctors.

Anti-vaccine charlatans wedge themselves into that tiny sliver of space that exists between informing yourself and getting information from your doctor. They convince parents that doctors are untrustworthy, bought, uninformed, and all manner of negative adjectives. Once parents are convinced, empowerment becomes a struggle between parent and doctor.

But empowerment ought to ease a parent’s mind rather than ramp up anxiety about becoming informed and understanding immunology. Empowerment ought to be a collaboration between doctor and patient, where patient feels free to ask questions at will and trusts that the doctor will give the best medical answers available at that time.

If we want parents to be vaccine confident, we need to assure them that they don’t need to know everything. We need to talk less about informed decisions and more about asking good questions and finding a trustworthy doctor.

Myths of the Minnesota Measles Outbreak

As of Friday last week, 68 people had been sickened by measles in the state of Minnesota since April 11. To put that in perspective, that’s more than had been sickened by measles in Minnesota from 1997-2016. Because of its significance, the Minnesota measles outbreak has received significant attention across the country. It has also been the source of continued anti-vaccine misinformation–possibly as an effort to downplay their own culpability in its spread. I’d like to go through some of that misinformation to clear things up.

The outbreak was caused by vaccine shedding.

Nope, nope, and nope. The virus being spread, per the Minnesota Department of Health, is the B3 genotype, one known by the World Health Organization to be circulating. The virus used in the vaccine is an A genotype.

The vaccine doesn’t cover the strain circulating in Minnesota.

Yes, this myth is a rebuttal used when the anti-vaxxers learn that the vaccine isn’t causing the outbreak. Everyone must be getting sick because the vaccine is useless. Nevermind that over 8,000 people have been exposed, and of the 68 people sickened, 64 were unvaccinated.

The truth about the vaccine is that while there are multiple genotypes of measles (think of the genotype os the spaghetti-looking stuff inside the measles virus, measles has only one serotype (think of the serotype is the knobby parts on the outside of the virus that). The vaccine is made to train antibodies to latch on to the surface of the virus–the knobby serotype–and to kill it. The vaccine works. It works remarkably well when you consider the over 8,000 Minnesotans who are not sick.

Here’s a photo from Vaccine Nation to clear the whole thing up (click to embiggen):

Measles is a Somali problem

Again, untrue. Measles doesn’t care where you were born. And, in fact, the people getting sick from measles are those born in the United States. They are Americans. Measles only cares if you are vulnerable–it is an unvaccinated person problem.

Measles is not in Minnesota because of refugees or immigration. You cannot use this outbreak as another feather in your xenophobia hat. Measles is in Minnesota because people were not vaccinated for it–pure and simple. The index case for the outbreak has not been identified, so it could have been someone traveling through the airport or to the Mall of America. It could have been someone coming home from a wild Romanian vacation. But people who travel to the United States to live and work are required to be immunized.

Somali parents are against vaccines

I hesitate to speak for any other parent about how they feel about vaccines, so I want to point out this interview with Anab Gulaid, a Somali-American researcher in Minnesota, who says, “Somali parents are not anti-vaccine. They are not the ones out there convincing other parents not to vaccinate.” Furthermore, state data seems to indicate that some Somali parents simply delay the MMR vaccine out of fear, while some get the vaccine on time. Representative Ilhan Omar, an important state and Somali community leader, states in this interview that her children “certainly are” immunized.

Minnesota’s anti-vaccine leaders only responded to Somali parent concerns

One of the starkest risk factors for vaccine hesitancy anywhere is in the vacuum of support parents of autistic children find themselves. Parents whose children receive a diagnosis are often left to navigate through the confusing world of special education, therapies, and insurance–not to mention a family life more complicated than they had expected. The anti-vaccine movement had an opening there, and they took it.

But they also persisted. During the outbreak, they have held meetings in predominantly Somali-Minnesotan neighborhoods, are currently translating the fraudumentary Vaxxed into Somali, and have attended Minnesota Department of Health community meetings to pass pamphlets out to Somali parents.

That’s not all. They are also looking to gain power within Minnesota by writing themselves into legislation. Before the outbreak began, they filed a bill in the Minnesota House that would have given their group, the Vaccine Safety Council of Minnesota, the power to oversee a statewide database of post-vaccine adverse events. (Yes, you read that correctly. They would have had oversight into medical information.) And during the outbreak, they had the chutzpah to file a bill that would have directed the Commissioner of Health to conduct a study of vaccinated versus unvaccinated Somali people. (Note: there aren’t enough unvaccinated Somali-Minnesotans to conduct such a study.) It is as if they won’t stop until everyone is sick.

Measles isn’t a big deal

This myth infuriates me. Anti-vaxxers want you to think that you can give your child megadoses of vitamin A and vitamin C, and that they will be just fine with measles. (In another racist turn on this myth, they claim that because a vitamin A deficiency is a cause of measles mortality in Africa, the fact that Somali children had parents who once lived in Africa puts them at special risk. As though these children do not have access to nutrition in the famine-stricken land known as Minneapolis.)

Measles is a big deal. A quarter of the children in this outbreak have been hospitalized. (And no, random internet person who argued with me last week, the term hospitalized doesn’t mean that they just walked into the hospital.)

What is it like being in the hospital with a child who has measles? This mother explains how her daughter’s illness changed her perspective on measles:

Soon after, the nurse put my daughter back in my arms, and then led us to where we would stay for the next few days. It was an isolation room, a small glass-enclosed space that held a crib, a television and a comfortable chair. Attached to the crib were bars to keep children from climbing out. The room reminded me of a zoo exhibit. The only thing missing was a sign saying, “Beware: human baby with measles.” In that moment, I couldn’t believe how my lack of awareness had led to such a frightening situation.

My child isn’t at risk for measles

If you think that because your child is vaccinated, you are probably correct. But if your child is unvaccinated, what magical powers do you believe you have to protect your child? Organic food can’t protect against an airborne virus. Being white and wealthy doesn’t mean anything to measles. Homeopathics and herbal supplements are no match for the most contagious virus on earth. You can either keep your child at home and away from everyone during an outbreak (and some are because their children might have been exposed at school or on the bus), or you can vaccinate. For my family, we vaccinated.

Oh, and by the way, the vaccine that protects against measles is safe.

Filling Wakefield’s Coffers

Really, that’s all VAXXED is about. The movie, written by, produced by, funded by, and starring Andrew Wakefield is about Andrew Wakefield. It came to the city where I live and caused very little stir.

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The Uptown theater in Minneapolis didn’t even list VAXXED in its marquee while it was being shown there.

Nor should it. Andrew Wakefield is a fraud, but he is also a washed up has-been. It was no surprise when friends of mine went to see the film, sitting in nearly empty theaters.

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My gut feeling is that this film, like many of the other anti-vaccine endeavors preceding it, will fizzle out with a whimper.

But not without a fight. The anti-vaxxers are goading each other to buy tickets to the film, even if they have no intention of using the tickets. They hide this racket by terming it a donation or calling it their “Angel Ticket” program. But what they are trying to do is to make this film seem like more of a success than it is so that they can push it out to more theaters across the country.

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The Hear This Well Facebook page is only one of many encouraging people to “donate tickets” (to whom? they don’t say) in order to sell out the theaters in Florida and pressure Regal theaters to show the movie nationwide.

I have to believe that Regal will notice that no one is actually in these so-called sold out theaters, although they might not care–as long as they are selling tickets. I have heard rumors from insiders that the VAXXED DVD is coming out next month, though. I don’t know any theater that would show a movie that is also out on DVD.

All this brings me back to the beginning. The movie itself is made by, written by, promoted by, and starring Andrew Wakefield. He tried to swindle us all once with a phony study and a media tour aimed at frightening us away from the MMR vaccine. Andrew Wakefield doesn’t do anything that doesn’t benefit Andrew Wakefield, and once again–even in the promotion of this film, the main beneficiary is Andrew Wakefield (and the main victims are public health and autistic people).

 

Anti-Vaxxers Dox a Child

One particularly vile and unethical way of shutting down opposition is to make public personal information about someone whose ideas oppose yours. Sometimes doxing comes with the presumption that others will then follow up by contacting and harassing that person. Often the defense on the part of the doxer is that the doxee’s information is already available online. However, giving that information to people who are ideologically opposed to someone makes that person a target, and thus doxxing becomes horrible and awful and you should never do it.

So why is it happening to a child? I guess the answer, if you don’t want to read any further, is that anti-vaxxers are narrowly hellbent on defeating anyone who champions vaccines that they don’t see a child as a child, a human, an actual person who should be off limits to harassment. Marco Arturo, whose adorable satirical video purporting to show all the evidence that vaccines cause autism (Spoiler: he reveals an empty folder), has become the target of Levi Quackenboss‘s doxing.*

I’m upset, my friends. And that’s really the motivation behind this post. However, because I don’t want to further the doxing and harassment, I won’t link to the blog post in mine.  But here you have a screenshot:

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In one particularly hypocritical point, “Levi Quackenboss” writes:

So who is Marco?  I’m not going to post his full name out of respect for him and his parents as well as their safety, but they’ve been a little sloppy about making trails to it so they should clean that up. The last names his parents use are not the name that he uses on social media.

Why is this hypocritical, you ask? You will notice that everyone who responds to “Levi Quackenboss” calls her she and her, not he or him–as you would expect with a man named Levi. Guess what. Levi Quackenboss is not the blogger’s real name! Oh shocking! (Or actually not at all.

Although, as a side note, I was irked that “Levi Quackenboss” used one of her pseudonyms to testify in front of a Colorado congressional hearing. Her testimony consisted of showing memes that Voices for Vaccines had made and making false and disparaging remarks about the organization and the Colorado VFV Parent Advisory Board member who was in attendance. She does seem to hide behind fake names to say horrible things.

A second aside, amazeball epidemiologist and awesome guy, Rene Najera points out this Picasso’s full name is Pablo Diego José Francisco de Paula Juan Nepomuceno María de los Remedios Cipriano de la Santísima Trinidad Ruiz y Picasso. So yeah. Marco didn’t use his full name.

“Levi” concludes her doxing piece against a child with this bit a conspiracy paranoia:

One thing is obvious, though: Marco isn’t just some random unknown kid when his parents have connections with the Mexican government and Walgreens is on standby with a celebrity media company to sponsor his pro-vaccine video.

Yes, because children of lobbyists never make videos and don’t have opinions. And Walgreens and Ashton Kutcher are apparently in on the conspiracy–along with the Mexican government–to cover up the vaccine-autism connection championed by such savory characters as Andrew Wakefield. People who believe this are really the same sorts of people who believe that Tupac is still alive and that 9/11 was an inside job.

This entire affair brought to mind an experience I had with a viral blog post and doxing. In December 2013, my organization (Voices for Vaccines) published a piece by Amy Parker titled “Growing Up Unvaccinated.” I actually hadn’t realized it was going viral until our website crashed and I was unable to access my email. Like Marco’s simple and marvelous piece, Amy Parker’s struck a nerve both among pro- and anti-vaxxers.

And the anti-vaxxers immediately pounce in some of the most despicable and horrible ways possible. They began by taking to Google and discovered someone named Amy Parker Fiebekorn who worked at the CDC. They immediately decided that because Amy Parker is such an unusual name that this CDC Amy Parker, and not the one from the UK whose actual biography we gave, was the true author of “Growing Up Unvaccinated.” You know–because if we went to the trouble of tricking people by secretly publishing a piece by someone at the CDC, we wouldn’t bother changing her name. This myth persists to the day and will pop up if you Google “Growing Up Unvaccinated Fake.”

Others were not satisfied and decided that perhaps Amy Parker didn’t work at the CDC. So they tracked her down. They found her profile and her mother’s Facebook profile. Some sent PMs. They found Amy’s cell phone number, and some began texting her. They found a video where she discusses her struggles with mental health issues and posted it publicly, as if to shame her with the stigma of mental illness. In one forum, one woman (who, by the way, makes a living teaching online classes about the dangers of vaccines), discussed paying her a visit:

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Amy Parker (the real one) had to shut down her Facebook page and take down her business page (which included her phone number). To make matters worse, the doxing and harassment came as she welcomed a new baby into her family.

Doxing has real consequences, and an adult shouldn’t have to deal with those consequences, but a child really, really should not have to. The doxing of Marco Arturo is despicable and has to stop now.

All this because a child made a satirical video. Grow up, anti-vaxxers. If you disagree with him, discuss your disagreement. Don’t disparage and harass a child.

*ETA: The doxing included in the Quackenboss post included the names of his stepfather and his mother and some employment information regarding his stepfather. A screenshot of the stepfather’s Facebook page included the name of their hometown. This information not only makes it easy to harass Marco and his family, but collating together could incite that harassment. 

Anti-Vaxxers Defeated by Twelve-Year-Old Whiz Kid

And they know they’ve been defeated. Do you want to know how we can tell? Because they are spending their time trying to tear this kid down.

Perhaps you are the last person in the world who hasn’t seen the phenomenal video by science whiz kid Marco Arturo. Marco presents all the evidence that vaccines cause autism–in a folder full of nothing. (I’m embedding the video at the bottom of this post–please watch it an up-vote it!)

The anti-vaxxers sure haven’t missed it. Some of our favorites have written rebuttals. Let me type that again so we can all understand what they are doing. The anti-vaxxers are rebutting a satirical video made by a 12-year-old. Surely they are taking this video in stride, right?

Uh, no. No they are not. They are losing their minds.

Blogger and salesperson Kate, who runs Modern Alternative Health, claims the video is “devoid of facts and amounts to little more than uninformed bullying” [emphasis hers]. Really, Kate? A 12-year-old is bullying you? I know a lot about bullying, about how people use their social power to make you feel excluded and to gain control over you. What kind of small person are you that a 12-year-old you have never met has social power over you? But she’s not done. Immediately after claiming that she is being bullied, she resorts to this classless diatribe:

Naturally, it’s being heralded by the kind of brain-dead pro-vaccine nut jobs that the internet regularly produces.  The kind of people who don’t understand the importance of actually examining new scientific information critically and having an honest conversation. . . . I kind of imagine them as “cavemen” of sorts — pounding on their keyboards, drooling, and thinking that they have won, while all of the actual intelligent people are smirking and shaking their heads at how painfully, obviously ignorant they are.

In the world of Kate (MAM) and other anti-vaxxers, a 12-year-old is a bully, pro-vaxxers don’t understand science, and only anti-vaxxers are intelligent (and smugly so). Also, up is down, black is white, and the sky is green.

From there, Kate’s post goes nowhere, repeating that the kid is a bully and that pro-vaxxers are terrible and dumb in all ways. It also doesn’t actually present any science showing that vaccines cause autism. In other words, she kind of proves Marco’s point.

By the way, here’s some evidence (okay lots of evidence) showing that vaccines DO NOT cause autism.

But MAMKate is not alone. National Vaccine Information Center (NVIC) is getting in on the act of rebutting a 12-year-old’s satirical video. (Because NO voices must ever say anything positive about vaccines without being actively shouted down.)

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NVIC has a history of classless, terrible behavior, including promoting the harassment of children. This time, they are getting in on the “take Marco down” campaign by posting a hit piece written by “Levi Quackenboss.”

The Quackenboss piece begins by claiming scientific pursuits concerning vaccines are a religious belief and intimates that Marco shouldn’t even be on Facebook because he is not the requisite 13-years-old yet. So actually, the piece begins by slamming Marco for being young and influenced by his parents (and science).

Then, in anti-vaccine style, she (Quackenboss) picks up the goalposts and moves them downfield. SV-40! Acellular pertussis! HPV! Monkey pox! Faked moon landings! Spaghetti at the ceiling! She discusses anything except, you know, how vaccines don’t cause autism–the actual topic of the video. It’s pure throat clearing written by someone who loves her own voice.

Then she goes on with a condescending and easily refutable diatribe, writing:

Little dude, I totally get that you love science but I’ve got some sad news for you: there’s very little science in vaccine science.

And following with every possible anti-vaccine trope she can find. Here are some answers for her:

After all these myths, Quackenboss ends with a smug little kicker, something meant to put a 12-year-old in his place:

Look, clearly you’re a smart kid in your knockoff Polo shirt and your eyeglasses that look like wraparound safety goggles.  I trust that one day you’re going to figure out that you’ve been lied to, not only by your parents but by your government and the leaders of this world, and you’re going to look back on this insulting video and say, “God, what a little prick I was.”

And that’s OK, Marco.  We’ll be here for you when you do.

But you know what, anti-vaxxers? Marco doesn’t need you and he isn’t interested in you waiting for him. One of you visited him, and he was ready for you.

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Credit: Karen Halabura

A final piece of advice for anti-vaxxers: pick on someone your own size. I mean that two ways: while Marco is smaller than you in stature, he is far larger than you when it comes to class and intellect.

Here’s Marco’s video. Please give it a watch. It will restore your faith in our future.